The Four Swans

The Four Swans (Poldark, #6)The Four Swans by Winston Graham
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I think Winston Graham’s writing just gets better and better in these books. This one had more setting than some of the other books did. I really enjoyed that aspect of it. The characters were alive and intriguing. I could “see” the TV characters while reading the words. Fully enjoyed it!

My reviews in this series:
Book 1) Poldark
Book 2) Demelza
Book 3) Jeremy Poldark
Book 4) Warleggan
Book 5) The Black Moon

Cables and Ladders Baby Blanket

I needed a baby blanket for a gift, and I found this cute – machine washable – yarn at Walmart. I didn’t have a pattern handy, so I came up with this one.

Materials Needed:
2 skeins Premier Puzzle yarn (7oz—328 yds)
Size 9 circular needle
sl2p = slip 2 sts as if to purl with the working yarn in front
cable4 = slide 2 sts onto cable needle at back of work, k next 2 sts, k 2 sts off cable needle

Cast on 3 sts. Work 3 stitch I-cord for 128 rows. Pick up 128 sts along I-cord and 1 more st at the cast on edge for 132 sts (including the original 3).

Row 1) sl2p, knit to last 2 sts, sl2p
Row 2) knit across
Row 3) repeat row 1

Begin Cable and Ladders pattern:
Row 1) k2, p1, [p1, k4, p1, k9], repeat between [ ] a total of 8 times, p1, k4, p2, k2
Row 2) sl2p, k1, [k1, p4, k1, p15], repeat between [ ] a total of 8 times, k1, p4, k2, sl2p
Row 3) repeat row 1
Row 4) repeat row 2
Row 5) repeat row 1
Row 6) sl2p, k2, [p4, k11], repeat between [ ] a total of 8 times, p4, k2, sl2p
Row 7) k2, p1, [p1, cable4, p1, k9], repeat between [ ] a total of 8 times, p1, cable4, p2, k2
Row 8) repeat row 6

Knit to desired length (model is 22 pattern repeats), ending with row 4.
Work 3 rows garter stitch. Bind off with 3-stitch I-cord. Secure ends. Finished size 30” x 30”.

S = slip one purlwise (yarn in front) * = knit 0 = purl large x = cable4

Dorothy and Jack

Dorothy and Jack: The Transforming Friendship of Dorothy L. Sayers and C. S. LewisDorothy and Jack: The Transforming Friendship of Dorothy L. Sayers and C. S. Lewis by Gina Dalfonzo
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

If you enjoy either or both of these authors, this is a book worth reading. Their friendship was unique, deep, and occasionally contentious when their opinions on a subject clashed. But as with all true friendships, the clashes only strengthened it. I can’t say the book was riveting, there were places I skimmed through, but being a fan of C.S. Lewis, I found it interesting enough on the whole.

400 Knitting Stitches

400 Knitting Stitches: A Complete Dictionary Of Essential Stitch Patterns400 Knitting Stitches: A Complete Dictionary Of Essential Stitch Patterns by Potter Craft
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I felt like I *needed* another knitting stitch pattern book. I picked this one because it includes both written and charted instructions and anymore I’m all about the charts. The photography in the book is excellent. All the samples are knitted in a neutral ivory that allows the reader to see the pattern well in the photos. There is a chart with each pattern, but they are quite small. Really small, actually. Older eyes aren’t happy with that, but in every other way, this book is top-notch.

Socks a la Carte

Socks a la Carte: Pick and Choose Patterns to Knit Socks Your WaySocks a la Carte: Pick and Choose Patterns to Knit Socks Your Way by Jonelle Raffino
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I’ve been knitting socks for *years,* but I bought this book because the idea of it was intriguing. I bought a used copy for a good price … and was glad I did. I’d have been disappointed to pay full price for it. While I love the idea, and some of the heel and toe treatments were new to me, I found a couple of errors in the book, and the knitted samples are all done in a variated red yarn that makes seeing the patterns very difficult. Worth it if you’re already comfortable knitting socks, and if you can find it for a discount price.

The Black Moon

The Black Moon (Poldark, #5)The Black Moon by Winston Graham
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is my favorite of the Poldark books so far. It was written twenty years after book 4, and the author had obviously grown in his craft. Writing styles were also changing during this time, so the book reads a bit more like a modern novel than the first four. But the characters are true to the beginning books, just as charming and riddled with issues of their own making as well as those beyond their control. Looking forward to the next one!

My reviews in this series:
Book 1) Poldark
Book 2) Demelza
Book 3) Jeremy Poldark
Book 4) Warleggan

The Lost Lieutenant

The Lost Lieutenant (Serendipity & Secrets #1)The Lost Lieutenant by Erica Vetsch
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A delightful tale of a man who has both a title and a wife thrust upon him by forces beyond his control. Both of the main characters in this book were interesting and engaging. The setting was brought to life in detail that enhanced without overpowering the story. Well worth reading if you enjoy Regency romances.

View all my reviews

The House at the End of the Moor

The House at the End of the MoorThe House at the End of the Moor by Michelle Griep
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A good story set in 1860s England. It’s told from three points of view, the hero, the heroine, and a villain, which makes it different from most romance stories. The heroine is written in 1st person point of view, while the hero and villain are written in 3rd person point of view. Others may enjoy that flip-flopping of perspective, but I found it jarring.

An Appalachian Summer

An Appalachian SummerAn Appalachian Summer by Ann H. Gabhart
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Yet another wonderful story from Ann Gabhart! In this book, she takes us back to Hyden with the Frontier Nursing Service. This time we meet a debutant fresh from her coming-out ball who winds up mucking stalls in the Appalachian Mountains while running from the man she doesn’t want to marry. It’s a fun cast of characters who will tug at your heart – and surprise you! – throughout the story. I’m a long-time Ann Gabhart fan and this one certainly doesn’t disappoint.

The King’s Mercy

The King's MercyThe King’s Mercy by Lori Benton
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I wasn’t sure what to expect with this book. The subject matter was all over the place with Scottish Jacobites and Colonial America, slavery and Native Americans. I had a little trouble following it all in the beginning, but once past that, it was a riveting story. There are good and bad characters of all nationalities, a feeling of true humanity throughout, and a compelling romance amid enough suspense to keep you turning the pages.